Monthly Archives: May 2009

If You’re So Sure You’re Right, Why Deny an IEE?

Published on May 31, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

I have been representing children with special needs in Connecticut since 1996.  Despite more than a decade in this field, I am always astounded by how many conflicts arise in special education because there is a fundamental disagreement between the parents and the school about whether a child has been properly evaluated.   It’s a pretty […]

Should I Bring a Special Education Due Process Hearing?

Published on by Jennifer Laviano

Very often, I am asked by prospective and current clients in my Connecticut special education law practice whether or not they should bring a Due Process Hearing on behalf of their child with disabilities. This is a very tough question, and really can not be answered in a general way, since each case is as […]

Parents of Children With Special Needs: Pick Your Battles

Published on May 28, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

Having represented hundreds of kids with disabilities over the years, I have gotten a first hand look at how frustrating the special education process can be, and often is, for their parents.  It often feels completely unbalanced and unfair.  As an example, I often leave IEP meetings with my clients saying to me “that was […]

Unseemly IEP Team Member: “The Pseudo-Psychologist”

Published on May 27, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

quick online loans “The Pseudo-Psychologist” The “Pseudo-Psychologist” does not necessarily have to be a school psychologist.  It is any staff member who begins throwing around psychological terms as if they are certain they have all of the answers.  Far worse is when you get the Pseudo-Psychologist who starts opining as to the appropriateness of the […]

“High Functioning” Autism: A New Battleground?

Published on May 26, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

As an attorney representing children with special education needs in Connecticut, I remember all too well the climate we faced over a decade ago, when the “first wave” of parents of children with autism were starting to challenge the appropriateness of the programs offered by their school districts. Back then, merely getting districts to acknowledge […]

Raising Children with Special Needs is Tough: Parent Training and Counseling Under the IDEA

Published on May 25, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

It’s hard enough raising kids in today’s world.  But when you have a child, or several children, with disabilities, just getting through each day can be an incredible challenge.  Many of my clients are overwhelmed, and who can blame them?  Whether it’s the mother of the child with autism whose behaviors are so challenging that […]

10 Tips for Starting a Special Education Law Practice, Part X

Published on May 24, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

The stakes are incredibly high when one is representing the interests of children with special education needs.  While I think it is a good idea to weigh the “pros and cons” of entering any field of practice, or any profession for that matter, my personal belief is that this particular calling requires more consideration, research […]

Should I Attend a Special Education Mediation?

Published on May 23, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

Each State is required under the IDEA to make Mediation opportunities available for parents of children with special education needs.  In fact, it is a procedural safeguard ever since the 2004 IDEA.  While the process is voluntarily for both parents AND school districts, some parents feel pressured to attend a Mediation, or even believe it […]

10 Tips for Starting a Special Education Law Practice, Part IX

Published on May 22, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

The stakes are incredibly high when one is representing the interests of children with special education needs.  While I think it is a good idea to weigh the “pros and cons” of entering any field of practice, or any profession for that matter, my personal belief is that this particular calling requires more consideration, research […]

If It’s Almost Fixed, Let’s Not Break It

Published on by Jennifer Laviano

It’s not even June yet, but my tolerance for the gamesmanship that accompanies so many Annual Review IEP meetings is getting lower by the day.  In particular, it never ceases to amaze me how very quickly some special education administrators want to yank services from a kid the moment it becomes clear that they are […]