Category Archives: Parents

“This Doesn’t Happen to People Like Us”

Published on April 12, 2012 by Jennifer Laviano

You won’t believe this story. In fact, I didn’t, at first.  As you might expect from a lawyer, I had to be convinced through documentary evidence.  Once I was, I couldn’t wait to share it! If you read my blog you already know that I’m a pretty jaded and cynical person.  I like to remain […]

A Mother's Day

Published on May 8, 2011 by Jennifer Laviano

Back Off Ex Girlfriend Quotes Last night, we took my mother out to dinner to celebrate Mother's Day.  While at at the restaurant, and on cue with the arrival of my own food, both my little ones let me know they had to go to the bathroom.  So, off I head to the ladies room, with […]

Footprints in the Sand: A Call to Parents of Adults with Disabilities

Published on September 24, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

buy essays for college I while ago, I wrote a tribute to Eunice and Ted Kennedy, and their legendary contributions to special education advocacy.  In that piece I commented that part of why parents of children with disabilities are at a disadvantage in taking on their school districts is that there is a constant learning […]

The Calm Before The Storm

Published on June 29, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

I feel a little guilty for having neglected my blog most of this month, but the volume of IEP meetings, mediation, and Due Process Hearing commitments has prohibited me from writing much other than responses to Motions to Dismiss, 10 day notice letters, and a whole lot of nasty grams! The month of June has […]

Even a Broken Clock…

Published on March 25, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

One of the hardest things about being a parents’ special education attorney is that there are times where you realize that the success or failure of the child’s case may depend on how capable the parent is at testifying.  That’s a tough pill to swallow. But every once in a while, you have a moment […]

“They Should Tell You This is Part of The Job!”

Published on November 16, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

Several years ago, I was cross-examining a teacher in a Due Process Hearing.  It was a pretty hotly contested case, and we were several days into testimony.  The student (my client) had severe dyslexia, which had been identified fairly early into her education.  Unfortunately, the interventions provided by the school district had been pretty ineffective.  […]

There’s Water on the Moon…What about FAPE?

Published on November 13, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

I had a discussion with a client today that went something like this: Client:  “I’ve about had it with this school district!  If things don’t get better, I’m going to move.” Me:       “You’re not moving anywhere, especially until you’ve spoken with me to make sure you’re not going from the frying pan into the fire.  […]

It’s Worth It

Published on August 18, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

Representing children and adolescents with special education needs is an honor and privilege, and I have to say that I really love my chosen field.   But some days it can also be exhausting and depressing.  School districts have the ability, and too often the inclination, to fight families over services, sometimes for years.  Time is […]

Unseemly IEP Team Member: “The Liar”

Published on June 20, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

“The Liar” Let me start by saying that, while I have unfortunately seen my share of dishonesty on the part of many IEP Team Members over the many years I have been practicing special education law on behalf of children, usually it comes in the form of misleading comments, convenient omissions, or minor misrepresentations when […]

Unseemly IEP Team Member: “The Cheerleader”

Published on June 8, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

“The Cheerleader” So, a parent of a child with special education needs arrives at an IEP meeting with a list of serious concerns.  Not infrequently, their child is struggling, and the parents’ disagreements with the program are significant.  There may even be severe academic or behavioral regression at the time of the meeting.  Sometimes the […]