Tag Archives: autism

VIDEO: Asking for an Independent Educational Evaluation

Published on November 13, 2012 by Jennifer Laviano

Years in the making, Your Special Education Rights.com is a video-based website we’ve created to help parents understand their rights.  Check us out at www.yourspecialeducationrights.com; we’d love it if you subscribed! cigar store Meanwhile, please watch the first of a series we’re making of simulated IEP Team Meetings, with tips from Julie Swanson and me […]

Fictitious Thinking: The “New” Definition of Autism

Published on January 21, 2012 by Jennifer Laviano

Do you remember the character Cassandra from Greek mythology?  Her curse was that she could accurately predict the future, but nobody would believe her when she warned them about it. Today I feel like Cassandra. In 2009, I wrote a blog post about the impending changes to the definition of “autism” in the DSM-V.  I […]

“The Behavior Guy”

Published on June 10, 2011 by Jennifer Laviano

As a parents’ special education attorney in Connecticut, I hear outrageous statements that parents are told by their school districts on an almost daily basis.  But, sometimes, I am told something that passes the realm of outrageous, and crosses into ridiculous. mobile phone surveillance equipment Today’s Ridiculous Comment You really can not make this stuff […]

"Why Would We Do an Evaluation, She Already Gets Services?"

Published on November 9, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

As a parents’ special education attorney in Connecticut, I hear outrageous statements that parents are told by their school districts on an almost daily basis.  But, sometimes, I am told something that passes the realm of outrageous, and crosses into ridiculous. Such statements mislead or misrepresent the school’s legal obligations, and always in a way […]

Footprints in the Sand: A Call to Parents of Adults with Disabilities

Published on September 24, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

buy essays for college I while ago, I wrote a tribute to Eunice and Ted Kennedy, and their legendary contributions to special education advocacy.  In that piece I commented that part of why parents of children with disabilities are at a disadvantage in taking on their school districts is that there is a constant learning […]

Connecticut Enacts Important Autism Legislation

Published on May 6, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

Another late night at the Capitol last night, showing support for the passage of HB 5425.  Around midnight, just before the legislative session ended, the Senate voted by consent (unanimously) to pass HB 5425.  Yes, this is the same bill that previously included very concerning language regarding Connecticut’s Burden of Proof in special education due […]

Questions on Autism, Neurodiversity, and Understanding

Published on October 4, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

You know those studies that demonstrate that eye-witnesses are not terribly reliable reporters?  There are several of them, and they usually involve a number of people who are unknowingly “set up” to witness a simulated crime.  Afterward, they are questioned about the details.  I am always somewhat amused by the incredulous reactions of the witnesses […]

Who Is Watching The Adults?

Published on June 13, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

I was just reading about that Florida teacher who asked her kindergarten class to vote on whether or not to keep a little boy with autism in the class.  The reason for the vote, apparently, was that he was exhibiting inappropriate behaviors in the classroom, for which he was routinely being sent to the Principal’s […]

Unseemly IEP Team Member: “The Riddler”

Published on June 1, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

“The Riddler” This can be any member of the staff or administration, who has been withholding pertinent information from the parents of a child with special education needs until the Annual Review IEP Meeting, or worse, until the parents have brought in a special education lawyer or advocate.  The Riddler has chosen not to share […]

“High Functioning” Autism: A New Battleground?

Published on May 26, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

As an attorney representing children with special education needs in Connecticut, I remember all too well the climate we faced over a decade ago, when the “first wave” of parents of children with autism were starting to challenge the appropriateness of the programs offered by their school districts. Back then, merely getting districts to acknowledge […]