Tag Archives: IEP Team meetings

The Tip of the Iceberg

Published on June 16, 2013 by Jennifer Laviano

It's been a fascinating several months here in Connecticut, as we have watched events unfold in the special education community in Darien.  The coverage has been wide locally, but if you don't want to read it all, here's the upshot:  the Special Education Director in this small, affluent town in lower Fairfield County (itself small […]

Ask for the Email

Published on November 18, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

Whenever parents retain my firm, I ask them to sign a form requesting all of their child's education records be sent to me as their special education lawyer.  It's a standard “FERPA” request…the easiest way to explain FERPA is that it is sort of like the educational version of HIPAA.  Bottom line is that I […]

"Why Would We Do an Evaluation, She Already Gets Services?"

Published on November 9, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

As a parents’ special education attorney in Connecticut, I hear outrageous statements that parents are told by their school districts on an almost daily basis.  But, sometimes, I am told something that passes the realm of outrageous, and crosses into ridiculous. Such statements mislead or misrepresent the school’s legal obligations, and always in a way […]

10 Special Ed "Back To School" Readiness Questions

Published on August 30, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

essay writing help online It's “back to school” time!  While many of my clients receive Extended School Year (ESY) services over the summer, I have learned over the years in my special education law practice that, regardless of whether your child receives ESY services, a number of things can occur over a summer that might […]

The Calm Before The Storm

Published on June 29, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

I feel a little guilty for having neglected my blog most of this month, but the volume of IEP meetings, mediation, and Due Process Hearing commitments has prohibited me from writing much other than responses to Motions to Dismiss, 10 day notice letters, and a whole lot of nasty grams! The month of June has […]

Connecticut Enacts Important Autism Legislation

Published on May 6, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

Another late night at the Capitol last night, showing support for the passage of HB 5425.  Around midnight, just before the legislative session ended, the Senate voted by consent (unanimously) to pass HB 5425.  Yes, this is the same bill that previously included very concerning language regarding Connecticut’s Burden of Proof in special education due […]

“But Quentin Tarantino is VERY Successful!”

Published on April 25, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

As a parents’ special education attorney in Connecticut, I hear outrageous statements that parents are told by their school districts on an almost daily basis.  But, sometimes, I am told something that passes the realm of outrageous, and crosses into ridiculous. american dream definition essay Such statements mislead or misrepresent the school’s legal obligations, and […]

First They Ignore You…

Published on April 17, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

One of the most frustrating aspects of my job as a parents’ side special education attorney is trying to help my clients regain trust in the system.  Sometimes, this is nearly impossible. As I’ve said before, by the time a parent of a child with special education needs has made the difficult decision to hire […]

What is an IEP “Amendment?”

Published on March 17, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

Every so often, Congress “reauthorizes” the IDEA.  The most recent was the 2004 Reauthorization, also known as IDEA04, and sometimes IDEIA (the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act).  When the 2004 IDEA came out, there were a number of changes with which I, and many parents’ attorneys and advocates, disagreed.  However, there was one change […]

A Simple Question, Well Placed

Published on February 18, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

Whenever I am asked to present to public school educators or special education administrators on the subject of the rights of children with disabilities, I try to remind them that, in every profession, continuing education should be embraced and appreciated.  This is because I have found so many problems when teachers feel threatened by a […]