Tag Archives: Parent networking for disabilities

“This Doesn’t Happen to People Like Us”

Published on April 12, 2012 by Jennifer Laviano

You won’t believe this story. In fact, I didn’t, at first.  As you might expect from a lawyer, I had to be convinced through documentary evidence.  Once I was, I couldn’t wait to share it! If you read my blog you already know that I’m a pretty jaded and cynical person.  I like to remain […]

A Mother's Day

Published on May 8, 2011 by Jennifer Laviano

Back Off Ex Girlfriend Quotes Last night, we took my mother out to dinner to celebrate Mother's Day.  While at at the restaurant, and on cue with the arrival of my own food, both my little ones let me know they had to go to the bathroom.  So, off I head to the ladies room, with […]

Bullying of Kids with Disabilities: How One Young Man Took Back Control

Published on March 31, 2011 by Jennifer Laviano

For followers of my blog, you know that the bullying of kids with disabilities is a subject that I believe has long been overlooked.  I have spoken and written about this topic for years, well before bullying was a fixture on the evening news. Recently, I had the chance to hear a very inspirational story about a […]

DON'T THROW AWAY ANYTHING!!!

Published on December 22, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

Sometimes it's difficult to know what to to be happy about as an attorney who represents children with disabilities.  As you can imagine, the facts that support a “really great special education case” are, by definition, at best unpleasant, and at worst horrific. It's an odd feeling, reviewing a child's special education records.  When I […]

35 Years of IDEA: A Dream Deferred?

Published on December 2, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

A few days ago marked 35 years since the federal special education statute, now known as IDEA, was signed into law.  It is hard to believe that within my lifetime, and probably yours, it was legally permissible to exclude children with disabilities from our public schools entirely. Think about that for a minute. A little […]

Ask for the Email

Published on November 18, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

Whenever parents retain my firm, I ask them to sign a form requesting all of their child's education records be sent to me as their special education lawyer.  It's a standard “FERPA” request…the easiest way to explain FERPA is that it is sort of like the educational version of HIPAA.  Bottom line is that I […]

Footprints in the Sand: A Call to Parents of Adults with Disabilities

Published on September 24, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

buy essays for college I while ago, I wrote a tribute to Eunice and Ted Kennedy, and their legendary contributions to special education advocacy.  In that piece I commented that part of why parents of children with disabilities are at a disadvantage in taking on their school districts is that there is a constant learning […]

Connecticut Enacts Important Autism Legislation

Published on May 6, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

Another late night at the Capitol last night, showing support for the passage of HB 5425.  Around midnight, just before the legislative session ended, the Senate voted by consent (unanimously) to pass HB 5425.  Yes, this is the same bill that previously included very concerning language regarding Connecticut’s Burden of Proof in special education due […]

On Giftedness, Disability, and Public Perceptions

Published on April 20, 2010 by Jennifer Laviano

So, I have been following the new series Parenthood with interest.  Yes, I loved the movie, and I like enough of the cast members to have tuned in.  But I started to commit to watching it weekly when I saw they were incorporating a story line about a family grappling with their child’s diagnosis of […]

Farewell and Thanks

Published on August 26, 2009 by Jennifer Laviano

how to enlarge penile length naturally It’s hard to believe that in the space of just two weeks, the disability rights movement has lost two great warriors:  Eunice Kennedy Shriver and Ted Kennedy.  And yet, it’s fascinating to consider the very different, and yet essential roles they each played in the movement.  As I reflect […]